Author Topic: UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES  (Read 756 times)

Offline HEATZ

  • PIKEY MOD
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4620
    • http://www.jdslawnmowers.ie
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« on: March 02, 2010, 11:25:12 PM »
NO 1

Adjustable shock mount


It was at last years NEC bike show , that I saw a company advertising an adjustable top shock mount for the new GSXR range. 'Trick Idea' I thought , I wouldn't one o' them for my 7/11 . I picked one up , had a good look at it, and then clocked the price - ?125 ! fuck that , I'll make my own thanks , and I'll make it better !

All the pics and drawings that follow , are of the one I made for my 1989 GSXR 750K , which fortunately , Suzuki saw fit to bless with a removable top shock mount , as they did on all 750 slingshots ( J to M ) and the 1100K also.

But whatever it's for , you can easily follow the same principles as this one , and modify the design to suit your own application. The main bracket is probably the only thing you'll need to change. You can make this out of steel or thick alloy plate , and weld or bolt it to your frame.
At the heart of the assembly is the adjuster screw. The beauty of this design ( unlike the others that are for sale) is that the ride height can be adjusted with everything in situ. As the 'fork' is able to spin on the adjuster screw , which is retained underneath by a bolt. All you need to do is loosen the locknut and adjust the screw to get the desired ride height. The application detailed will allow an adjustment of 12mm either side of the nominal position , which due to the geometry of the suspension linkage is more than enough to achieve up to a 50mm increase ( for quicker steering or just 'the pose') or a 50mm decrease in ride height ( for extra stability or that 'on the deck' drag racing stance. Generally ( on Suzuki’s ) a 5mm change at the shock equates to around 35mm change at the wheel.

Start off by making the lower clamp. Measure the existing fork mounting on top of your shock and then replicate the following pattern in the pics to your dimensions. Then get the screw  adjuster made – in essence , a piece of 25mm steel bar, turned with a thread on the outside , a hex machined at the top ( for your spanner adjustment) – the bottom should have a flange and a sleeve to support the fork and then an M8 internal thread to accept a high tensile bolt .this will secured the fork to the adjuster screw , but still allows it to spin , so that you can adjust it without removing the shock. Then you've got to make yourself a bracket to accept the screw adjuster. Basically its just an 'L' shape with a couple of strengthening webs supporting the top plate. The top plate needs to be threaded to accept the screw . On mine I made a threaded steel 'insert' pressed into the alloy plate for extra strength .

Each application will be different, the main thing is to copy your existing geometry . i.e. the position of the upper shock 'eye' in relation to the point at which your mount attaches to the frame. Use the pictures as a general guide of how things should turn out.

Points to note ,
Only adjust the ride height in small increments – even a 10mm change in ride height ( at the wheel) can have a significant effect on the way your bike will handle

When you do your 'working out' consider what items could 'foul' each other at the extremes of adjustment – if you jack it right up – you may find the chain will quickly eat into your lovely polished swingarm at the front – due to the change in swingarm angle. at the other extreme make sure you’re not gonna do summat silly like crush your brake hose , when the suspensions at full compression  

































BY UKlee
« Last Edit: March 02, 2010, 11:35:17 PM by HEATZ »
Ballbags

Offline rybes

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3723
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2010, 11:44:26 PM »
thats a good find HEATZ. gutted i didnt think of doin that for Caminskis gix
ive the memory of a goldfish with alzheimers :D even goldfishes support DTP

Offline HEATZ

  • PIKEY MOD
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4620
    • http://www.jdslawnmowers.ie
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2010, 12:07:03 AM »
NO 2

Bandit GSXR Cam link tech info

These have been around for a while now but surprisingly few people actually know what the do. The same questions pop up on internet forums all over the world time and again. And more than a few folk dish out inaccurate ?facts?. It?s pretty clear that there seems to be a lot of confusion over these cam link thingies - here's your definitive guide to exactly what they do  /don?t do.
 
First , let clear up some terminology !
 
Cam link / cam to cam kits ? A misnomer ! - the camshafts themselves  are mounted about 30mm above the bungs you remove to fit the kit , you are actually connecting the inlet rocker shaft bung to the exhaust rocker shaft bung on the ends of the cylinder head - usually by a couple of banjo's and banjo bolts and a short ( 6" or so ) length of hose or in some cases a lump of billet alloy with drilled oil passages.



Often advertised as ?equalising and /or increasing the oil flow between front and rear cam shafts?

Lets make this perfectly clear - These do FUCK ALL for oil flow / cooling / power or anything else to do with the engine , except add weight and complexity and an extra place to leak oil from.  That said , plenty of folk think they look cool , and if that?s all they are after ? then fine !
 
Top End Oiling Kits - similar to the above  , but not the same ! these take an oil feed from another point on the engines oil circuit ( usually the 8mm allen bolt on the side of the cam cover ) and divert it to the rocker shafts via the bungs on the side of the cylinder head.



Top end oiling kits were designed for bikes equipped with Big Block motors and / or those running high lift cams and heavy duty springs with a lot of valve seat pressure.

LUBRICATION
 
The GSXR  /Bandit oil cooled motor uses a 'dual chamber' oil pump . The first chamber supplies oil at high pressure for lubrication. This oil is pumped into the main oil gallery running the width of the engine in the lower crank case , and then is distributed around the engine from then onwards via a myriad of galleries and jets.



You can see from the lubrication diagram - the oil that feeds the rocker shafts is sucked through the strainer in the sump by the pump. This is then pumped from the main gallery running the full width of the lower crankcase , through smaller galleries into the upper crankcase half right next to the cylinder liners for 1 & 4 , this oil is then directed up around the 4 outermost cylinder studs through to the head , along the ports ( the bungs that allow access to the rocker shafts ) and through the centre's of the hollow rocker shafts . from here the oil is pumped directly into the camshaft bearing journals cast into the cylinder head and also onto the rockers through ports drilled into the rocker shafts - lubricating the contact point between the rocker and the camshaft lobe.

COOLING

Remember the ?SACS? anonym the used to grace the panels of the older GSXR?s ?
This is the Suzuki Advanced Cooling System -The second chamber is for oil cooling.



You can see from my diagram , the second chamber of the oil pump supplies oil at high pressure to the head - upwards via the external ?Y? feed hoses at the back of the block and into the ports at the rear of the cam cover cam cover. The oil then moves through internal passages cast inside the cam cover. You may have noticed that the 4 10mm hex headed bolts  securing the centre of the rocker cover are hollow - this oil moves down those hollow bolts through the o ring gaskets around the spark plug tubes into the cylinder head and directly onto the roof of the combustion chamber to carry away heat (SACS). This is what makes the venerable GSXR / Bandit motor ? oil cooled ? . Where others used water to remove heat from combustion chamber and exhaust valve area, Suzuki use oil.


Why the need for a top end oiler kit then ?
 
BIG BLOCKS
When fitting a big block, you need to machine the upper crankcase half to accept the massively oversize liners. 9 times out of 10 when machining the crank case , you will 'break through' the small bore feeder galleries that pump oil up the studs and onto the rocker shafts. Where this is the case , the engine builder will block off these broken galleries all together to prevent oil pressure loss. ( often called 'dry blocking' )

You can see in the pic the oil ports right next to the rear , outermost cylinder studs . This crankcase has just been machined to accept the liners from a big block , and the arrow on the right shows where we have broken through into the oil gallery that will eventually supply oil to the cams.



You now have the problem of no oil going up the stud holes to feed the rockers , hence a top end oiling kit. It simply takes pumped oil from the cooling circuit and re introduces it directly through the bungs in the head to the core of the rocker shafts and onto the cam / follower surface. Similarly , bikes running high lift cams / heavy duty springs need extra lubrication due to the high pressures exerted onto the cam lobe by the follower. A top end oiling kit significantly improves oil flow around this area - indeed many aftermarket cam manufacturers in the states insist a top end oiling kit is used. In the case of a big block - As long as the crank case ports have been blocked off properly ( assuming the galleries were 'broken into' during the crank case machining ), all oil pressure is maintained , and the rockers / cams are lubricated much more effectively.
 
 HOT CAMS
When running cams with lots of lift and / or duration - heavy duty valve springs together with ?hardwelded? rockers are often specified too. The uprated valve springs allow the rocker to follow the replacement cams more aggressive profile without bouncing at high rpm ( otherwise know as valve float ) , this is achieved by the extra pressure the uprated spring exerts on the follower ? and hence the camshaft lobe also. All this extra pressure can quickly take it?s toll on normal rockers, at the point where the camshaft runs ? the ?pad? . So for really hot cams ,the rockers are modified by having their existing pad material ground off , this surface is then replaced by ?hard welding? and results is a much harder surface . Of course , just like a standard rocker it wont last five minutes unless it?s effectively lubricated. The valve spring is doing its best to squeeze the oil out of that contact area between cam and rocker ? a proper top end oiling kit increases the oil flow to that specific area and they really do work ? this is the reason that most aftermarket camshaft manufacturers who make more aggressive profiles for the oil cooled GSXR / Bandit motor specify the use of a top end oiling kit.

For the guys running heavy cam to lobe pressures , it's not necessary to strip the motor and 'dry block' it . Fitting a top end oiling kit on an otherwise standard motor WILL still significantly increase the amount of oil fed through the rockers and onto the cams . The negative effect of diverting some of the 'cooling' oil is generally considered as negligible . In any case , all the oil splashed around under the cam cover pools around the combustion chambers before draining back down into the sump via the two large drain tubes and the front two cylinder stud holes either side of the cam chain tunnel ? so it?s still plating a part in cooling the head anyway !
 
As explained previously , the kits you see which simply 'link' one rocker bung to the other - do absolutely nothing for the cams - they're just for show.
 
Some kits, show a couple of feeds taken from the main oil gallery via the plug under the ignition cover and connect to the bungs on the RH side of the motor ,the other side then has a simple cam to cam link.
This  WILL be effective - but only on the rockers for cylinders 3 & 4 ! , the pressurised oil has no way of getting to the rockers on cylinders 1 & 2 ! ? there?s a big gap for the cam chain tunnel in between them remember !. This could be rectified by routing some hoses round to the other side as well though and although this would be just as effective as the more traditional top end oiling kits that take their feed from the cam cover ? it?s more complicated and generally a lot less tidy.

MAKE YOUR OWN !

Why shell out a couple of hundred quid , when you can make your own ? It you?re not bothered about having a lump of billet alloy hanging off the side of your engine , and want a kit that is just as effective and can still look good too ? then it?s relatively cheap simple to make it yourself .

We?ll start with a simple ?cam link? kit. The first thing you?ll need is the head bungs ? 2 choices , buy some ready made ones from stainless ( they are available separately from the likes of BSR Aerotek who advertise in this very mag or just make some ! . For a start you?ll need the 14mm Hex shaped head plugs from any of the GSXR oil coolers ? the bandit ones are no good as they are round with an Allen socket. Best done on a lathe - just drill through the centre of the plug and tap it M10x1.25 to accept a normal banjo bolt , face it off to ensure the sealing surface is flat and if your fussy chrome plate it afterwards !



Next is the link pipe ? You?ll need some ?re usable? ( i.e not the crimped type ) dash 3 banjo?s . I often use old stainless brake hoses that I?ve picked up over the years , but again you can buy all the bits separately from a number of places . Make the one end up as normal by cutting the stainless braided hose &  slipping the socket over . I use a good sharp pair of cutting pliers for a nice clean cut. Then use a small flat screwdriver to the flare the braid away from the nylon inner. Push the brass olive onto the nylon inner firmly , ensuring the stainless braid is on the outside of the olive all the way around. Push the banjo into the nylon pipe through the olive and lube the thread , then pull the socket up and screw it onto the banjo. Once it?s tight , fit the one end onto the head plug and measure the length that you need to trim the other end to. Cut it to length , fit the other banjo and ? job done !



To create a ?proper? top end oiling it , there are a couple of extra steps.
First you need to get the special banjo bolt that will replace the 8mm cap head currently blanking off the oil gallery in the cam cover. This is a bit more tricky to make by yourself , but it can be done ( see pic ) I started with a 10mm x 40mm  cap head bolt (only partially threaded) then drilled &  turned it on the lathe to get the same features as a normal banjo bolt , but with a plain 8mm x 1.25mm  thread on the end instead of the usual fine thread 10mm x 1.25mm . You can however buy this special bolt ready made ! ? go to BSR Aerotek and ask them for the special 10mm banjo bolts with an M8 thread from their GSX 1400 cam link kit !



All you have to do then is tap into the cam link , either by using a Tee piece fitting ( as in the pic ) or by using a double banjo on one of the head plugs.



Simple, effective and a lot more satisfying than handing you money over to a shop ? not to mention a damn sight cheaper !

So there you go ? everything you wanted to know about ?cam link kits? but were too afraid to ask . Along the way , we?ve busted  the myths , dispelled the rumours  , and consigned to the bullshit firmly to the bin. You?ve learnt the facts about the intricacies of the GSXR oil system and I?ve been Lee Workman.

It?s been emotional.

Lee
Ballbags

Offline HEATZ

  • PIKEY MOD
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4620
    • http://www.jdslawnmowers.ie
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2010, 12:09:07 AM »
Quote from: rybes;265670
thats a good find HEATZ. gutted i didnt think of doin that for Caminskis gix

Lee gave me the files to post em up theres more to come :thumbs:
Ballbags

Offline HEATZ

  • PIKEY MOD
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4620
    • http://www.jdslawnmowers.ie
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2010, 12:47:53 AM »
NO 3

GSX-R 1127 COIL SPRING CLUTCH CONVERSIONS

Words & pics: Lee Workman

Before we start, I?m no journo, so you?ll have to forgive the lack of long and rambling intro and humorous asides throughout. I?m an engineer by trade  and have been messing around with Suzuki?s big bore oil-cooled motors for ages and I?ve picked up a few tricks and developed a few of my own along the way. I?ve done this coil-spring clutch conversion a few times on later GSX-R?s (and Bandit Twelve?s too). It?s cheap, very effective and it?s a piece of piss, so here are the facts.
There are the two types of clutch unit fitted to the GSX-R range and Suzuki?s first attempt, the coil spring type, is definitely the best. Fitted to all GSX-R Slabsides from 1986 through to 1988 (the 1052cc G/H/J models), it uses ten steel driven plates and eleven fibre drive plates and is clamped together with four coil springs acting on an alloy pressure disc. With any clutch, the limiting factors are the unit?s overall strength, the surface area available and the clamp load on the drive and driven plates. The design of the Slabside coil-spring unit excels in all three areas - this unit can easily cope with even the most ham-fisted wheelie/burnout merchant and on the road it should handle over 160bhp as stock. For the heroes or for strip use, it can be still further improved with the use of heavy-duty coil springs, and for the serious drag racers out there, there are a couple of aftermarket ?lock-up? type conversions, which bolt straight in and replace the existing pressure disc. The lock-up is the ultimate in super-strong non-slip clutches,





Then there?s the diaphragm type. Fitted to all GSX-R Slingshots from 1989 through to 1991 (the 1127cc K/L/M/N models), it uses a similar clutch basket and the same  driven and drive plates as the earlier Slabside clutch (with the exception that there are only ten drive plates in this unit), but the plates are clamped by two diaphragm springs acting on a different pressure disc design. This unit is fairly robust and is less prone to ?judder? than the coil-spring type, but it starts to struggle with more than 140bhp and if you like your wheelies and burnouts or if you launch it hard on the strip, it?s not long before it gives up the ghost .
There is already a conversion kit on the market from APE, costing around ?190, which converts a Slingshot diaphragm clutch to a coil-spring unit like that of the Slabbies and, therefore, allows the fitting of a ?lock up ? kit at a latter date if necessary. But I?m going to tell you how to do it (using quality components) the cheap way. You can either get the stuff from breakers for around ?30 or, using NEW genuine Suzuki parts for about ?80 ? about half the cost of the over-the-counter unit. And in a later article, I?m going to tell you how to fit one into your Bandit Twelve motor too, so keep any eye out for that, okay?
Anyway, in preparing this article I?ve been down to my local Suzuki dealer to get the correct part numbers for you to order and latest prices (all are plus VAT and correct in August 2002). And to ensure that those of you using second-hand stuff from the breaker?s get the right bits off the right models, I?ve already checked to see which part numbers are superseded by later ones, and that the information given is correct to the best of my knowledge and experience etc. Aren?t I good to you lot, eh?
Firstly for those of you starting with a Slingshot GSX-R 1127 (a K, L, M or N model), you?ll need the following parts:

No.   Description    Suzuki Part Number   Qty   Price ? (ea.)   Source Model
1   Clutch inner hub   21410-06B02   1    49.46   GSXR1100 G,H & J
2   Pressure disc   21462-06B00   1    23.49   GSXR1100 G,H & J
3   Coil springs   09440-20013   4      1.31    GSXR1100 G,H & J
4   Spring spacers   09180-06174   4      1.72    GSXR1100 G,H & J
5   Washers   09160-06020   4      0.53    GSXR1100 G,H & J
6   Bolts   01107-06307   4      0.71    GSXR1100 G,H & J
7   Drive plate    (Fibre)   21441-48B00   1      9.53   All GSXR 1100?s



Then you?ll need two extra components - a 10mm steel ball bearing from your local bearing factors, and a hub nut spacer too. You?ll need to get one of these knocked up by someone with access to a lathe or any local engineering firm should make you one for around a fiver. The dimensions are 35mm OD and 25.5mm ID and it needs to be 10mm thick.
Got all them? Good, so here?s how you actually do it. Firstly, shift the transmission into first gear and remove the nine screws from the clutch cover. Then take off the clutch cover and remove the large circlip in the centre of the hub before you take out the pressure disc lifter and the push piece and its bearings. Hold the pressure disc from moving using the special tool no.1 (see below), undo the big holder nut and remove the diaphragm springs and the spring seat and then the pressure disc. Remove the drive and driven plates, followed by the wave washer and its seat, then hold the hub with special tool no.2 (see below an? all) and undo the hub nut and remove the nut, washer and  hub assembly. Important - ensure the long (steel tipped) alloy pushrod and the thrust washer between the basket and hub is still in place or you?ll be buggered.
Now fit the new hub. Problem number one - you?ll notice that the hub nut and washer will not now tighten down because there aren?t enough threads on the countershaft. This is because the Slabside hub has a thinner base and the Slabside countershaft is shorter, so this is where the spacer is needed on the driven shaft. Fit it over the shaft, then you can secure the new hub using your original nut and washer using special tool no.2 to hold the hub while you tighten the nut to the correct torque (140 to 160Nm or 102 to 115ft-lbs). Now re-fit your original clutch plates (as long as they?re not fucked, check the fibre ones for the correct thickness - 2.52 to 2.68mm / 0.100? to 0.106?) and check the steels for warpage using a feeler gauge and a piece of plate glass (max limit 0.10mm / 0.004?), starting with a fibre one, then steel and so on (you should finish with steel, if you?re not a complete wazzock). Now fit the extra fibre one you?ve just bought.





Problem number two now rears its head - because of the differences in the length of the countershafts, your clutch push rod is now, effectively, too short. This is where you fit the ball bearing - it will take up the gap between the alloy pushrod and the push piece. Fit your push piece complete with its thrust bearing and washer and then fit the new pressure disc using the new spacers, springs, washers and bolts and secure the bolts in a criss-cross pattern to the correct torque setting (11 to 13Nm or 8.0 to 9.5 ft-lbs). Re?fit the clutch cover, check the oil level and you?re away! You?re now the owner of a coil-spring clutch ? told you it was easy!



Now, extra hints and tips. Tip 1: When you do the job, put the bike on its sidestand and carefully lift the front wheel and chock it on a brick - this will stop you losing any oil when you remove the clutch cover. Tip 2: When buying new clutch plates, use only genuine Suzuki parts ? I know they?re more expensive, but it?s false economy to put cheapo plates in. I know, I?ve tried ALL the super-trick/heavy-duty ?performance? clutch plates and they just don?t compare with the genuine stuff. You have been warned! Top 3: With this particular conversion you fine-tune the biting point by changing the ball bearing - if it drags too much (assuming you?re using the correct grade oil and the steels aren?t warped), then you need more travel so try fitting an 11.5mm one instead. If it slips (assuming the fibre plates and/or the springs aren?t worn), you need less travel so pop in a 9mm one. It really does make a difference!
Also take the time to make the special tools, they?re a piece of piss to make, and really make life easier. Special tool one: You?ll need two pieces of steel bar that are 200mm long, 25mm wide and 5mm thick (ish ?), drill two 6mm holes in each bar with the centres 165mm apart then, at one end of each bar, fit a M6x30 bolt and secure it tightly with a nut on the underside. At the other end, open out the 6mm hole to 8mm and join the two bars together with a M8x70 bolt and loosely secure it with a nut on the underside. To use it, the M6 bolts will neatly fit into the slots on the diaphragm pressure disc and the M8 bolt will fit straight into the swingarm spindle - once the slack is taken up, you?ve got both hands free to undo/tighten the big 50mm holder nut!
Special tool two: First get one 400mm long piece of square section (20x20mm) bar and two old GSX-R clutch driven (steel) plates. Put the plates on top of one another and drill three holes equally around the diameter and secure them to the square bar using two M6x60 bolts and 20mm spacers and a couple of M6 nuts  (this way, you can support the basket really well and reduce the chances off slipping, as the plates will be deep inside the unit). Finally put a small M6x10 bolt and nut through the remaining hole to secure the plates together. This is a wicked tool to have, when you?re trying to remove/secure the hub nut at 160Nm!






Bandit

The clutch assembly fitted to all Bandit 1157 motors is, frankly, shite.



Based on the same principle as the GSX-R Slingshot unit, it?s diaphragm-sprung with ten driven plates and ten drive plates of 225mm diameter (the GSX-R?s are 230mm diameter which doesn?t sound much, but offers a huge increase in surface area for friction) and has a cheap cast alloy basket with a steel reinforcement strap fitted in an effort to stop it flying apart (as opposed to the large all-steel basket used in the GSX-R).



Under normal circumstances this unit is fine but, as soon as you start giving it a reasonable amount of abuse or tune the engine, it will struggle to cope with the extra demand and eventually slip. Heavy-duty diaphragm springs are available and will slightly improve matters at the cost of a heavy clutch lever, but the whole unit is better off in the bin. Trust me ?



To convert your Bandit 12 clutch you?ll need the following parts from Suzuki ,

No.   Description    Suzuki Part Number   Qty   Price ? (ea.)   Source Model
1   Clutch inner hub   21410-06B02   1    49.46   GSXR1100 G,H & J
2   Pressure disc   21462-06B00   1    23.49   GSXR1100 G,H & J
3   Coil springs   09440-20013   4      1.31    GSXR1100 G,H & J
4   Spring spacers   09180-06174   4      1.72    GSXR1100 G,H & J
5   Washers   09160-06020   4      0.53    GSXR1100 G,H & J
6   Bolts   01107-06307   4      0.71    GSXR1100 G,H & J
7   Drive plate    (Fibre)   21441-48B00   11      9.53   All GSXR 1100?s
8   Driven plate  (Steel)   21451-48B00   10      5.47   All GSXR 1100?s
9   Clutch Basket   21200-40814   1   176.53
GSXR1100 K,L,M & N



Yep, you?ll need to replace that crappy clutch basket, they are expensive new, but you could get one from a breaker, you can use one out of any Slingshot model. Beware ? they look identical to the earlier Slabside one, but the 1052cc motor has different gearing on the crank. The primary driven gear at the back of the clutch basket of Slabside engine has 73 teeth. The bandit primary driven gear (being essentially a 1mm over bored 1127 motor) has 72 teeth ? the same as a slingshot one.

Follow the previous instructions for the GSXR?s then, once the inner hub is completely off, remove the outer basket also.



Pull the basket partially out, then push it back in again, this will expose the needle roller bearing and the spacer, remove these from the shaft then remove the clutch basket and alternator/oil pump drive gears  careful remove alternator oil pump gear from the b12 basket and fit it into the slingshot basket
If its still stuck to your clutch basket, you will need to (carefully) remove this bandit drive gear, and fit it to the GSXR basket. They are totally different; the alternator/oil pump drive gear off a GSXR has different pitch teeth and will foul your bandit alternator driven gear and your oil pump driven gear.
Once you?ve done this you can fit the new GSXR Basket using the original thrust washers in their original places.
Ensure the alternator an oil pump drive fears are engaged with the driven gear behind the basket
When positioning the basket on the counter shaft and sliding it ?home? - take extreme care to line up the alternator/oil pump drive gears with the alternator and oil pump driven gears, if they are not fully engaged, and you tighten the hub nut, it WILL snap, and they cost around ?80!
Fit the new coil spring hub assy just like the GSXR procedure with one exception, -
The counter shaft of the bandit engine is again longer than the Slabside one, but it?s different to the Slingshot counter shaft, the dimensions for the bandit spacer are 35mm O.D, 25.5mm I.D and 6mm thick. Also as the original bandit hub has a different thickness base to either of the gixxers, it still works out that you need a 10mm ball bearing to take up the slack between your original bandit pushrod, and your push piece.
Again secure the hub using your original nut & washer on the new spacer fit the new GSXR clutch plates and pressure disc assy as above.
And you too have a GSXR spec, coil spring clutch! , Again you can go and fit a lock up straight on if you wished! , Or leave it as it is and go and do stoopid stuff, safe in the knowledge that you?re clutch can take it!

Now, extra hints and tips. Tip 1: When you do the job, put the bike on its side stand and carefully lift the front wheel and chock it on a brick - this will stop you losing any oil when you remove the clutch cover. Tip 2: When buying new clutch plates, use only genuine Suzuki parts ? I know they?re more expensive, but it?s false economy to put cheapo plates in. I know, I?ve tried ALL the super-trick/heavy-duty ?performance? clutch plates and they just don?t compare with the genuine stuff. You have been warned! Top 3: With this particular conversion you fine-tune the biting point by changing the ball bearing - if it drags too much (assuming you?re using the correct grade oil and the steels aren?t warped), then you need more travel so try fitting an 11.5mm one instead. If it slips (assuming the fibre plates and/or the springs aren?t worn), you need less travel so pop in a 9mm one. It really does make a difference!
Also take the time to make the special tools, they?re a piece of piss to make, and really make life easier. Special tool one: You?ll need two pieces of steel bar that are 200mm long, 25mm wide and 5mm thick (ish ?), drill two 6mm holes in each bar with the centres 165mm apart then, at one end of each bar, fit a M6x30 bolt and secure it tightly with a nut on the underside. At the other end, open out the 6mm hole to 8mm and join the two bars together with a M8x70 bolt and loosely secure it with a nut on the underside. To use it, the M6 bolts will neatly fit into the slots on the diaphragm pressure disc and the M8 bolt will fit straight into the swingarm spindle - once the slack is taken up, you?ve got both hands free to undo/tighten the big 50mm holder nut!
Special tool two: First get one 400mm long piece of square section (20x20mm) bar and two old GSX-R clutch driven (steel) plates. Put the plates on top of one another and drill three holes equally around the diameter and secure them to the square bar using two M6x60 bolts and 20mm spacers and a couple of M6 nuts  (this way, you can support the basket really well and reduce the chances off slipping, as the plates will be deep inside the unit). Finally put a small M6x10 bolt and nut through the remaining hole to secure the plates together. This is a wicked tool to have, when you?re trying to remove/secure the hub nut at 160Nm!



Anyway, in preparing this article I?ve been down to my local Suzuki dealer to get the correct part numbers for you to order and latest prices (all, are + v.a.t. ,and correct at August 2002), and to ensure that those of you using second hand stuff from the breakers get the right bits off the right models. I?ve already checked to see which part numbers are superseded by later ones and that the information given is correct to the best of my knowledge and experience etc? aren?t I good to you lot, eh?

by UKLee
Ballbags

Offline HEATZ

  • PIKEY MOD
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4620
    • http://www.jdslawnmowers.ie
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2010, 01:30:27 AM »
NO 4

LOCK UP CLUTCH CONVERSIONS

Words & pics: Lee Workman

As with most of my previous tech contributions this article is based on the GSXR / Bandit oil cooled family of engines, But the principles and usage of this lock up clutch will apply to most of today?s motorcycle engines.
In the distant past I explained how to convert your weak ass  ?89-?91 GSXR diaphragm clutch (SF issue 106) and the woefully feeble Bandit 1200 clutch (SF issue 110) to the much more beefy Coil spring unit that could be found in the early ?86-?88 Slabside GSXR?s. This unit should be able to put up with around 160 bhp & even the most ham-fisted abuse from your typical streetfighter rider. But what happens when you?ve just bolted on the big shiny turbo kit you found in the smalls section or that 100bhp nitrous oxide kit you?ve blagged of ebay? , Well after upping the NOS jets on my own bike I?ve just found out ? Clutch slip!  Arrgghhh!! . Previously, my 1216cc B12 engined GSXR750 was kicking around 160bhp at the rear hoop and the coil spring converted clutch coped admirably, even with the occasional 40hp shot of N20 . I?ve recently upped the ante with the jetting and it?s now shooting an extra 80 snorting horses through the clutch and despite it?s best efforts, I?m getting major clutch slip, especially in the higher gears. So what?s the answer? ? A ?Lock ? up? unit.

WHAT IS A ?LOCK UP CLUTCH? & HOW DOES IT WORK?

Well, it?s pretty simple really, a flat plate with four (or in some cases six) pivoted arms (or ?stations?) bolts on top of your existing pressure plate, using longer versions of your existing bolts. As engine speed increases the arms ?swing out? under centrifugal force and push against the pressure plate ? gripping the clutch pack (the fibre & steel plates) tighter & tighter as rpm increases, preventing slip ? simple!

DOES A LOCK UP AFFECT NORMAL ROAD USE / ABUSE?

No, it doesn?t affect the normal action of the clutch at all, and it hardly influences the force needed at the lever .You can still hold the clutch in with the transmission in gear when your sitting at the lights / junction etc. You are still able to ?slip? the clutch (when crawling in traffic etc) .You can still pull the clutch completely in, even at the red line - to save your underwear in the unfortunate event of your chain coming off or the motor seizing. And yes, you can still ?clutch it up? in 2nd (as you do) for those ?through the box? mingers that you like to do for those schoolgirls hanging out at the local chippie.



HOW TO INSTALL THE LOCK UP UNIT

Installation really is a piece of piss, On GSXR / B12 motors you would have probably converted to the coil spring type clutch already mentioned, so when you remove the nine M6 bolts on the clutch cover, you?ll be faced with this,



Remove the four bolts on the pressure plate, and remove the springs & spacers. Check the length of the spacers before reinstalling (they need to be their stock size of 0.550? / 13.97mm) as they are made from alloy and often get crushed with use. Although not required, it would be a good idea to remove the entire clutch and inspect it for wear and damage, check your steel pates for glazing and warpage and replace any worn fibre plates. Gasket surfaces on both clutch cover and engine cases should be inspected for potential leak paths and cleaned thoroughly in preparation for final assembly.  If you?re using heavy duty springs, then put the stock ones back in ? you wont need them at first, and if you can get away without them permanently ? your left hand will be glad of the break!
Providing everything is hunkey dorey and the clutch assembly is re-installed and ready (less the stock spring bolts), place the lock up unit into position and secure it using the four longer fixings provided in the kit .A rotational bolt tightening sequence (similar to a car tyre change) works best.



   Once the lockup plate assy is installed, you need to fit & tighten the ?weights? supplied (nuts & bolts!) on the arms .The instructions in the kits usually specify the use of threadlocker, personally I prefer to use locking nuts (the deformed head type NOT nyloc) but it?s your choice. Even if the desired weight hasn?t yet been selected, thread locker (or locking nuts) must be used to keep the weights from working loose during initial assembly. Assemble the weights in such a way that the unit will be balanced ? see pic



   Once you?ve got to this stage you need to check the clearance gap between the pressure plate and the lock up arms. There needs to be a gap for the clutch to work properly. With the arm weights pivoted toward the centre-most position, measure the ?air gap? between the outside of the stock pressure plate and the inside (closest point) of the lockup plate assy. The spec for this measurement will come in the kits instructions, on this particular M.R.E. unit the gap needs to be 0.125?    +/- 0.025? (3.175mm   +/- 0.635mm). If you are out of range you?ll need to modify it accordingly by removing material from the spring spacers or adding washers / making new longer spring spacers)





   You?re now ready to refit your clutch cover, but as it won?t fit over then new lockup unit you?ll need to use one of two options. Option one is the spacer plate; fitted in between the stock cover and the engine casings it?s a neat and simple solution to the problem. The only downside is the need for two gaskets - hence doubling the chance of a leak from the joints.



   The other option is a modified cover, Basically a copy of the stock cover but with an extended ?bowl? to give clearance for the lockup unit. Some kits will come with this special cover, some will come with the spacer, and some will give you an option of either. The advantage is that you keep the stock length bolts and only one gasket ? but the covers that usually come with these types of kits are sometimes of very poor quality (certainly not good enough for polishing!) and more importantly the oil sight glass is often missing or blanked off completely! , Which is a right pain in the arse. However for the more flush amongst you there is a very good looking & practical variation on the theme. You know these ?windowed? clutch covers that are all the rage at the moment? , Well ,by design they need to have a machined ?ring? welded to the case to accept the window. Just ask the engineering firm that supplies the windowed cover to make yours     with a thicker (about 1 ?? / 40mm) machined ring. It shouldn?t add much to the cost of the cover, you still only need one gasket, you get to keep the all important oil level sight, and of course you can now see your trick lockup unit through the window!



   Once you?ve decided on which method your going to use, you can refit you clutch cover, secure all the fixings and check / top up the oil level as necessary.
   
POST ASSEMBLY

   Pull the clutch lever in slowly; turn the motor over by hand to ensure you have no binding or clearance problems. If all is OK, your installation should be complete and you can fire up the bike to further check and set any remaining clutch adjustments.



?TUNING? THE LOCKUP CLUTCH
One of the best features of the lockup is its adjustability ? especially on the drag strip. As there are so many variables to a good launch -this can only ever be a ?rough guide? to tuning your newly fitted lockup. Things like wheelbase, power, weight, and personal technique all have an effect on how your clutch is expected to perform.
Tuning your clutch involves two basic areas; SPRING and WEIGHT.

SPRING
   The combined amount of spring pressure you have determines how ?hard? your initial move is. Too much spring pressure causes excessive wheel spin, too little results in clutch slippage. Generally, you want to use as heavy a spring as you can without spinning the wheel of the line, but you should still begin with stock springs regardless. Use your 60? time as a tuning reference. If the bike is ?lazy? off the line, step up to heavier springs until your 60? time slows due to wheel spin. Likewise, if you are spinning the wheel, step-down or ?soften? the springs until you get a spin free launch, or your 60? time slows due to clutch slippage. The secret is to find a happy medium and stick with it.

WEIGHT
   For drag racing, as far as weight is concerned you want to lock-up the clutch as early into the run as possible. With most kits available, the amount of weight supplied ( basically a bag of matched washers !) should be sufficient to lock-up anything short of a 7 second funny bike. Although you may want to experiment with different weight values, critical weight selection really depends on information supplied by a computerised data recorder, and as most folks haven?t got access to this kind of equipment (I know I certainly haven?t!) we?ll have to rely on the ?seat of the pants? data logger commonly known as trial & error.
   Some general weight tuning tips are; 1) stay away from the pies  (oops, sorry!)
1)   Reducing weight may provoke some slippage in higher gears, but will also delay the lock-up effect on the clutch pack; possibly helping to reduce wheel spin at the top of 1st and beyond.
2)   Adding weight will help to correct clutch slippage in higher gears. Particularly if your turbo starts boosting in earnest or you hit the button for the laughing gas
Begin by adding a pair of M6x 0.5mm washers to each arm or  ?station?, gradually adding a washer to each station until slippage stops. NOTE most kits advise that 6 washers per station should be considered the maximum.

?STAGING? THE WEIGHT, AND / OR SPRINGS
   For an example ?Staging? can be especially helpful to adjust a bike that leaves the line perfectly, but starts spinning the wheel as it gets towards the top of first / second gear. If necessary most lockup kits available can be set up as 2 or even 3 stage systems of both spring & weight. The only requirements are;
1)   the lock up plate must have either 4 ( like the unit in the pics ) or 6 stations, and ,
2)   you must have the knowledge to set it up.
The standard ( single stage ) set up requires all arm stations have the same weight, and the springs the same pressures each. A two-stage set up is defined by every other   arm / spring station having one weight / spring value , and the remaining stations a different ( lighter or heavier ) value. A three-stage set-up (6 station only) is defined by each pair of opposing arm / spring stations    having the same value, but every pair having different (lighter and heavier) values from each other. Thus the plate assembly may be staged, whilst still remaining balanced ,
   Critical weight / spring selection really requires a spring tester and a  gram scale .. A point should be made that weight staging is not dependent upon spring staging and vice-versa .The most important point is to keep the whole assembly balanced .

And that?s about it really , realistically the possibilities are endless .It?s just a case of experimenting with the weights and noting what differences you can feel on the bike . There?s nothing ?magical? about they way a lockup works ,You don?t need any special tools or equipment, and there?s no real reason why you shouldn?t have one on your road bike if you really need / want one. Hopefully I?ve explained some of the commonly asked questions about lock up clutches

by UKLee
Ballbags

Offline SFC

  • DTP Member
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4380
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2010, 07:03:33 AM »
Quote from: HEATZ;265672
Lee gave me the files to post em up theres more to come :thumbs:

i read a few of his how to's, the guy is very talented, thank you from me :nodyes:
"your only supposed to blow the bloody door\'s off "

Offline Froudy

  • Creaky Moderator
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13751
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2010, 08:41:58 AM »
Loads of good info here:nodyes:

Thanks for posting these Heatz:thumbs:
Assumption is the mother of all Fuckups

Offline Westers

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1461
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2010, 08:58:17 AM »
Bleedin' hell - that adjustable shock mount article would have saved me a load of time faffing around measuring up for my own version of it. Pretty chuffed though as mine's the same dimensions !!

Offline HEATZ

  • PIKEY MOD
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4620
    • http://www.jdslawnmowers.ie
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2010, 12:41:55 PM »
NO 5

Fancy fitting a new tail unit to your streetfighter?

Lots of people do, and do it well, but there are also some right Abortions out there with seat units supported by bits of 2" x 2" and nylon tie wraps etc ? I know, I've seen 'em! . The are loads of ways to skin the proverbial cat, such as to modify your existing subframe, or even make a bespoke one from scratch. I've tried both of these in the past with varying degrees of success, but I've found the most effective way to do it, is to replace you're existing subframe with one off the bike that the seat unit came off. At first it can seem a bit of a daunting project but if you think about things while you're doing them then it really is a piece of piss. It's also a lot less pissing around than fabricating a one off subframe, and the results are far more satisfying than modifying you're existing subframe.

So is a donor subframe the way to go? I decided to do it this way for several reasons.
 
1) Use the subframe that matches the seat unit - everything will bolt right up, with no problems, you can keep the matching front and rear seats, the seat locks, under tray etc, and all the little detail things that people overlook, like helmet hooks, and a battery tray, somewhere to put your bits 'n' bobs are all there.

2) Should the worst happen, replacement is simple. Cuz your using a stock (un modified ) subframe - a new one will bolt right on in it's place , similarly ? you don?t have to modify the bodywork to fit the o.e. Subframe, so if it does go tits up then a set of replacment plastic from the breakers will fit without any fuss

3) Any aftermarket goodies meant for the donor, will fit easily to your bike too, like a trick under tray, flunky replacement lamps, a pillion seat (or seat cover), pillion footrests or even those 'off the shelf' twin under seat exhaust conversions etc

4) Done with a little care & attention to detail, it'll look like a pukka 'factory' job.

Here's how I did mine,

This is what you'll start off with



Get the stock bodywork off



The next stage is to cut off the existing subframe, and remove all traces of any 'lugs' etc, from the spars of the main frame.



Bolt the seat unit to the subframe and 'mock' it up on your bike (I used bits of wood & metal straps) until your happy with the position of the seat unit.



Next use some thick cardboard to make the templates for the tabs that will need to be welded to the frame, to accept the new subframe. Once they are spot on, cut them out of some thick (I used 1/2") alloy plate, and once they are shaped and in the correct position, you can get them welded to the frame.




 
You can see that compared to the old subframe, the lower rails of the Y2K one line up nearly exactly with the main spars of the Slingshot GSXR frame - thus, the lower 'tabs' are dead easy to fabricate. The upper rails of the Y2K subframe are roughly 1/2" too far inboard, and as the main spars of the Slingshot frame kinda 'slope in' just at the point you need to attach to, the upper tabs are slightly trickier to make - needing a bit of a twist, as well as an offset. DO ALL YOUR TEMPLATES IN CARDBOARD! Time spent here getting the templates EXACTLY right, will pay dividends later on! . I then cut the fuel tank mounting strap off the original subframe, and re used it on top of my new 'frame tabs', using the fuel tank to hold it in position whilst I welded it onto the tabs
I also extended the fuel tank with a couple of 'ears' so that the tank blended in with the seat unit, and also covered most of the upper tab - this got rid of that ugly gap which often remains when fitting a non standard seat unit. It was easy to do, and the result was exactly what I wanted to achieve



Once all the cutting, shaping and welding was sorted, I tidied everything up with a good polish.



Now all the hard work is done, and the panels are back from the painters, you can sit back and admire your handiwork!





I think it looks great! , And there's even room for a 'sting' in the tail



Well, Almost! - I'm using a 5 lb NOS bottle, and only a little bit pokes out behind the number plate - I covered it in Carbon Fibre to match the under tray - Stealth or what? !!



So there you go, hope this helps you guys who fancy doing a similar mod.


by UKLee
Ballbags

Offline carlzrx

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 876
UKLEEs HOW-TO ARTICLES
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2010, 11:18:02 PM »
:score10::score10::score10::score10: best thread ive read in a long time cheers HEATZ:cool2: